Friday, July 22, 2016

The “flu,” Influenza, resolves with no specific treatment. However, it can be deadly for children under two to five years of age. Adult flu risk factors include age over sixty five, residents who live in care centers, and those with as asthma, heart disease, obesity, kidney disease, and diabetes.
Flu symptoms include fever over 100 degrees with muscle aches. It can be transmitted from one person to another by coughing, sneezing, or handing an object to another person who has the flu. Seasonal influenza targets young children and older adults. People with weakened immune systems and those who live with other residents, such as nursing homes, are more likely get the flu. .Antibodies against past flu sickness provides no protection against the current flu virus.

Flu risk factors include having had cancer treatment, anti-rejection drugs for organ transplant, and HIV/AIDS infection. The flu virus weakens the immune system. It increases risk for those with asthma, diabetes, and heart problems. Prescription medications that shorten the clinical course include Oseltamivir (Tamiflu), and Zanamivir (Relenza), both administered by inhaler. These medicines should not be prescribed for those who have underlying COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease) or asthma. Symptoms can be alleviated by drinking water, juice, and warm soups. These remedies prevent dehydration. Increasing sleep time bolsters the immune system. Tylenol or Ibuprofen alleviate muscle aches.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends annual flu vaccination for everyone over the age of six months. Frequent hand-washing lowers flu risk. Alcohol-based hand sanitizers prevent spread of flu sickness.
Sources of flu sickness including child care centers, schools, auditoriums and public transportation facilities. Antiviral medicine side effects include nausea and vomiting. These symptoms can be lessened if the medicine is taken with food.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends annual flu vaccination for everyone over the age of 6 months.
Each year's seasonal flu vaccine contains protection from the three or four influenza viruses that are expected to be the most common during that year's flu season. The vaccine is available as an injection or nasal spray.
The flu vaccine isn’t one hundred percent effective. Thorough and frequent hand-washing is an effective way to prevent infection. Use alcohol-based hand sanitizers if soap and water aren't available. Cover your mouth and nose when you sneeze or cough. To avoid contaminating your hands, cough or sneeze into a tissue or into the inner crook of your elbow. Flu spreads easily wherever people congregate, including child care centers, schools, office buildings, auditoriums and public transportation areas. If you’re sick, stay home for at least twenty four hours or until symptoms resolve. Drink plenty of liquids to prevent dehydration.
This will lessen your chance of infecting others. Getting more sleep can bolster your immune system. Use over-the-counter pain relievers, such as acetaminophen (Tylenol), or ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) to combat the achiness associated with influenza.

Be careful not to take too much of Tylenol or Advil. Overuse of these medicines could cause a rare side effect, Reye’s Syndrome.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends annual flu vaccination for everyone over the age of six months. The vaccine is available as an injection or a nasal spray.
Use hand sanitizers if soap and water aren't available. Cover your mouth and nose when you sneeze or cough.
Flu spreads easily wherever people congregate, to include child care centers, schools, office buildings, auditoriums and public transportation. By avoiding crowds during peak flu season, you reduce the infection risk.
If you do get the flu, stay home for at least twenty four hours after your fever subsides This will decrease your chance of infecting others.

Source: http://www.medscape.org/sites/advances/influenza-prevention

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