Thursday, March 31, 2016


How well do you retain information after reading a newspaper, book, or an instruction sheet?  

Reading is crucial for memory retention, comprehension, and abstract reasoning. People may have problems with retention. As we age, memory and abstract reasoning slow. Here are some recommendations to help you retain and understand what you're reading. They will sharpen your reading skills.

1.  Read with a purpose. Periodically check to see if you are on-task.  Minimize distractions. Ask yourself, "why am I reading this?"

2.  Skim first, but put emphasis on pictures, tables, and headings, Proper skimming includes illustrations  and pictures. Have an adequate light source

3. Get enough sleep and minimize distractions. Read with a purpose. Ask yourself, "Why am I reading this?" Read carefully those portions that contribute to fulfilling the reading purpose. Ask yourself, "why am I reading this?" To remember what you've read, think about word meanings.

3. Get the mechanics correct.  Focus attention, Avoid distractions and multi-tasking.

4.  Be judicious with highlighting and note taking. A more effective technique is to highlight only key words. Sticky tabs and yellow markers speed the study process.  

5.  Think in pictures.  They're easier to recall than words.

6. Rehearse again to bolster memory and comprehension. The advantage of rehearsing is to stay on-task and rehearse as you read.  Emphasize the portions that contribute to fulling the reading purpose. High priority material should be skimmed first. This primes memory, orients thinking, and  creates an overall sense of the material. It bolsters retention.

7.  Rehearse soon after the assignment is finished.  Review the material the next several days.

Recommended sources:
Image result for picture of older person reading a manual"How to Effectively Read and Implement Books."  Aaron Lynn.
On-Line:  "Why to Read: 7 Simple Reading Strategies to Help You Read More Effectively."
 "Study Right:  4 Steps to Reading a Textbook Quickly and Effectively."

Source:  http://sharpbrains.com/blog/2006/ll/11/why-do-you-turn-down-the-radio-when-youre-lost/